Video Essentials

Revolt Offers 7 Rules for Engaging with Millennials


Music broadcaster Revolt has done a lot of research into how brands can connect with that coveted youth demographic, and it’s offering the results for free. Here are Revolt’s “7 New Rules for Engaging Millennials.”

Revolt1. Use Online Video for Discovery

Video shouldn’t complement a brand marketing campaign, Revolt says; video should start the campaign. One in two millennials turn to YouTube when researching something new, and 73 percent say they prefer discovering their own path when making a purchasing decision.

2. Treat Brand Loyalty Like a Two-Way Conversation

Gone are the days when consumers created brand relationships for life. Now, young adults want to sustain that relationship in a human way. One in three say they value when brands are honest and admit their flaws. Eight out of ten want brands to act like a person, not a company.

3. Rush to Market

Rather than conducting long research and development cycles, bring new products to market quickly and watch early engagement turn to advocacy. Millennials want brands to experiment with new methods and co-create the product with the buyers.

4. Meet Customers In-Person

It’s not all about the computer with millennials: 71 percent appreciate when brands connect to them by fueling fun live events.

5. Market in Real-Time

It’s a tough way to work, but marketers nowadays need to be able to react in real-time. Millennials expect marketing messages to be as timely and relevant as their social feeds.

6. Don’t Try to Be Everywhere

Millennials don’t have accounts on every social network, and they don’t want you to, either. Choose the platforms that work the best for your brand and understand how to customize your message for each platform.

7. Build Brands on TV

It’s not all about online video with millennials: 63 percent like the lean-back experience of TV and 57 percent like TV content better. Use online video for reach and frequency, but TV to engage and start a conversation.

Revolt created its survey numbers by questioning 1,004 14- to 34-year-olds.




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