Video Essentials

Using Twitter for Video Marketing: Tips and Advice From Experts


When it comes to video marketing, Twitter is often last on everyone’s list. It shouldn’t be. Twitter remains an obscure and curious universe to many marketers who shy away from tapping its potential, despite its tremendous reach. When it comes to video marketing, many people first consider alternatives like YouTube, Vimeo and Facebook. Twitter shouldn’t be regarded as unchartered territory. With the addition of Vine, it gives video marketers a unique opportunity to start, join, and monitor conversations about their products and services.

TwitterBirdsMarketingSherpa research has found almost two-thirds of marketers don’t take advantage of Twitter. A small fraction of company marketers actually use Twitter as a marketing base. When they do, they find their audience to be technically sophisticated and involved. That symbiosis makes for a valuable and involved demographic: The engaged Twitter audience actively tweets about company products. This provides direct, immediate, and measurable feedback as well as usable data on consumer trends and acceptance.

Viral Success in 140 Characters or Fewer

In its truest sense, Twitter is a micro-blog. It is an open forum that is a cross between instant messaging and a chat room with messages sent in 140 character increments. It is optimized for mobile phones, so brevity is key. Tweets are received through a company’s browser, cell phone, email, or IM client as soon as a Twitter user tweets about a company product or posting. Tweets can also generate buzz about company videos, driving business prospects to a website. They also give the company an opportunity to join the discussion and engage with viewers.

How to Use Twitter Effectively

What are the best ways to engage consumers and use Twitter as part of a video marketing campaign? San Francisco, California-based social media marketer David Howard offers these tips:

  • Locate the hash tags that a key Twitter audience follows. Be sure to include these tags in company tweets with video content.
  • Try to tap into human emotions with video content. Videos must always move the audience. Reference that emotion in the video’s tweet. For example: “Need a good laugh? Check out our video at (insert link).”
  • Keep videos as short as possible. In today’s online world, companies are often stealing time from people who should be working. Viewers are more willing to watch content if it is short and sweet. One minute videos attract more views than 20 minute marathons. If your video is short, tell Twitter followers how long it is with a tweet like “Want a good laugh? Check out this video, only 30 seconds!”
  • For longer videos, companies should use YouTube annotations to create links within a video allowing viewers to skip to a particular section. This is done by creating label annotations on the video with a link to another time marker. Read this YouTube page for an explanation of links and annotation types.
  • Use Twitter for lead generation by promoting links to landing pages that summarize the content of the video. Promote a recorded webinar or video podcast with a screen grab or short video excerpt of the main content. Tweet a message like “Free #webinar on generating more #sales. Watch today!” to drive viewers to that page.
  • Videos promoting products and brands should have key messages up front. Doing this ensures viewers get the message before viewer falloff occurs. Never assume viewers will watch all the way to the end.
  • Host videos with a recognizable and reliable service like Vimeo or YouTube. Video hosting sites should not have screen controls or other messages that interfere with the video’s key text or logos. Produce videos with guard zones. This means placing key video content in areas that will be unobscured by commercial messages, logos, or branding from host video sites.
  • Produce multiple short videos to see which is most effective. Promote similar videos over time on Twitter. Present multiple calls to action in a tweet to measure which video gets the most viewership or clicks. Cycle the videos by creating a Twitter timeline where tweets are scheduled over a specific time period. Make comparisons on what tweets and videos got the most buzz

All A’Twitter With Possibilities

Twitter is not only an effective video marketing platform, it’s also a great way to see what the competition is doing and saying about their competitors. Likewise, marketers can use Twitter to see what the competition is not doing. Discover some customer complaints on Twitter to learn how to gain an edge over the competition

Nikki Means, CEO of Project Socialize told OnlineVideo.net:

  • Video marketers should use a variety of messages to promote the same video throughout the week on high traffic days to increase overall reach. Remember that different copy speaks to different people and increases overall views.
  • Twitter ads are a must if “eyes on the video” is the goal.
  • Pin the latest video to the top of a company’s Twitter profile page.
  • It is important to have a strong call to action to drive the reader to watching the video.
  • Shortened links can breed distrust. Make sure to use YouTube or Vimeo links when posting video.

Kali Keesee, eCommerce coordinator at MicroD, Inc. recommends:

  • Always keep hashtags relevant and to the point. Start by seeing what hashtags are trending. A good source is What the Trend. After finding a popular and relevant hashtag, use it in a video campaign to drive traffic and get people talking.
  • Select a hashtag that targets a specific group or subject. Hashtags were originally used for group tweets and evolved into a way to follow trends. Create a descriptive hashtag for video campaigns to make it easier for consumers to find the videos on Twitter. Remember that hashtags are all about grouping information into a subject or trending phrase.

Twitter provides fertile ground to promote video and gain a group of highly dedicated followers. It lets video marketers identify target users and build a following for their videos. Use it to build brand equity and dedicated consumer relationships. Failing to use it is connectivity lost.




Discussion

Comments are disallowed for this post.

  1. I really like your tips in this post. I typically feel as though Twitter isn’t much of a useful tool, but you have shown me numerous of proactive actions I can use. I look forward to reading more posts from you.

    Posted by Anish | September 25, 2013, 3:31 pm
    • Thank you so very much Anish. I look forward to posting more articles that you find helpful.

      Posted by Shelley M. Johnson | September 28, 2013, 3:19 pm