Video Essentials

Brands Need to Target Efforts for Strong Results Online


How can brands best leverage social TV and online video to achieve strong results? According to a panel at Thursday’s Next TV Summit in New York City, they need to target different online areas, create focused content, and work harder than ever before.

Deliver the right experience to the right platform, said Tricia Melton, senior vice president of entertainment marketing and branding for Turner Broadcasting. What works on Facebook isn’t right for Twitter, and Twitter content isn’t right for Tumblr. Marketers’ jobs have gotten harder, she said, because each platform demands its own targeted approach.

BrandPanelOne reason marketing efforts are so fragmented is because marketers haven’t yet decided what online success looks like when dealing with social TV. Is it about engagement, impressions, or gross ratings points? asked Jeff Siegel, senior vice president of global media sales for Rovi. Success is about charting with the right metrics, but the industry hasn’t yet agreed on a metric for online success.

“Big data” creates another situation where marketers need to maintain a sharp focus. Increased social networking has created lots of data points, but marketers have to know what they’re looking for or they’ll drown in all that data. If you’re listening to everything, it’s just noise, said Beth McCabe, vice president and group director of social marketing and technologies at Digitas.

“You could hear anything in the data, but you have to decide what you’re looking for,” McCabe said.

One smart way brands can use social networks is to look for timely conversations to take part in. That keeps the brand relevant, McCabe said. Look for inflection points where people are talking intensely about something. She cited Oreos, which tweeted the message “You can still dunk in the dark” during the Super Bowl blackout, as a success.

When it comes to marketing a brand with online video, McCabe said that some brands benefit from campaigns that cause a lift in sales, while others do better with awareness campaigns. She cited Philadelphia cream cheese, which ran a campaign called “The Real Women of Philadelphia” with celebrity chef Paula Deen, as a brand that experienced immediate lift from online video. In the campaign, women were encouraged to film themselves creating original recipes using Philadelphia cream cheese. Luxury brands, on the other hand, do better with awareness campaigns.

It’s impossible to think of media and creative as separate things anymore, McCabe said. You can’t have one without the other, and both need to work together to execute a single vision.

 




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